Find Your Improvement Topic

Unknown-1LEARNING ABOUT CHANGE AND IMPROVEMENT

There are over 500 posts on this website which I developed four years ago to help our nation’s police improve. For example:

 

  • Leadership.
  • Leading change.
  • Defining quality policing.
  • Rating your police.
  • Hiring and training police.
  • Responding to public protest.
  • Officer-involved shootings.
  • Use of deadly force.
  • Living your values.
  • And many, many more.

Use the “search” icon on the upper right corner of this page to find the topic(s) in which you are interested.

I speak from a perspective spanning over 50 years — over 30 of them as an active police officer and leader — then as a writer and commentator.

Over 1,200 people follow this blog both from the U.S. and from over 130 countries around the world.

Police and their improvement is an important topic for any society that is committed to democratic principles and a high quality of life for its citizens.

And, remember, police improvement is everyone’s job whether you are an active police officer or citizen.

  • Improvement happens when we all work together!

3 Comments

  1. I am not a LEO nor have I ever been one. And Having served in the Armed Forces for 25 years, I learned a lot about commitment. When I was 18 years old I took an oath — among other things — to support and defend the Constitution of the United States. I understand that most law enforcement agencies require a very similar oath when they first join up. But why is it that this same oath is ignored afterwards? I would suggest that the oath be recited at the beginning of each and every shift — to include all supervisory personnel from the chief on down. All right, so it sounds corny at first blush. Consider this however: how better to remind all hands that their job is a whole lot more than collecting a pay check.

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    1. Very wise thought, Tim. I also served in the military and have alwasys been surprised that a underground culture can override the core values of a group. “This I believe…” is a strong statement and can affect one’s behavior — that is, to be able to walk our talk. Thanks.

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